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CANCER

Cancer's sweet cloak

Sugars on cell surfaces help tumors hide from the immune system.

SCIENCE NEWS


*Winner of 2018 Biedler Prize for Cancer Journalism

Scientists and parents band together to research cures for rare childhood cancer

A research start-up is connecting parents with scientists in hopes of sparking new research on diseases whose survival rates haven't budged in 30 years.

NPR

Leaving a legacy

Two mothers, each with a son who died of brain cancer, worked together to increase awareness and acceptance of tumor tissue donation.

CANCER TODAY

COVID

These data science wizards tell us what's really happening with coronavirus

Find out if the curve is flattening where you live, how other states compare, and how flat the curve really needs to get.

POPULAR MECHANICS

Cheap generics might treat COVID-19, but obstacles abound

Even in the midst of a global pandemic, the clinical trial system in the United States is inhospitable to independent researchers.

MEDSCAPE

Investigating antidepressants' surprising effect on COVID deaths

Researchers are still puzzling over what this drug does at the molecular level to help COVID patients.

SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN

FOOD ALLERGY

Why parents are turning to a controversial treatment for food allergies

An idea based on a century-old concept could soon receive FDA approval. But will it cause more anxiety than relief?

UNDARK

What's new in food allergy etiquette

A record number of kids and adults are in danger of suffering serious allergic reactions to everyday foods the rest of us eat without a second thought. Here's how to be a good neighbor and make our shared spaces safe and fun for everyone.

REAL SIMPLE

Could gut microbes be key to solving food allergies?

New therapeutics are testing whether protective bacteria can dampen harmful immune responses to food.

KNOWABLE

+ more

FOOD ALLERGY (cont.)


Medscape

How does farm life protect children from asthma and allergies? August 2022

Managing overuse of food IgE panels: Multiple approaches needed. March 2022

Peanut oral immunotherapy is safe and effective in toddlers in large placebo-controlled trial. January 2022

Peanut allergy patients reap continuing benefits past first year, Palforzia study shows. August 2021

There's a much safer food allergy immunotherapy. Why don't more doctors offer it? (Part 1 of 3 - PDF) July 2021

Direct-care allergy clinic specializes in sublingual immunotherapy (Part 2 of 3 - PDF) July 2021

Sublingual immunotherapy: Where does it stand? (Part 3 of 3 - PDF) July 2021


Nature Biotechnology

IgGenix: engineering antibodies to fight food allergies. June 2021


NPR

Allergists debate anticipated FDA approval of a peanut allergy drug. September 2019

A new treatment can relieve food allergies, but few doctors offer it. February 2019


Science News

Fecal transplant pills helped some peanut allergy sufferers in a small trial. February 2020

An experimental toothpaste aims to treat peanut allergy. February 2020

Liquid mouth drops could one day protect people from peanut allergies. September 2019


Science News for Students

New success in treating allergies to peanuts and other foods. February 2020

Food allergies can trigger stress and anxiety. February 2020


Undark

An unorthodox allergy clinic seeks to disrupt medicine. April 2021

Book review: Targeting the bane of food allergies. October 2020


WebMD

Needle-free epinephrine options are on the horizon. April 2022

Food allergy families seek out hard-to-find immunotherapy. October 2021

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IMMUNOLOGY

'Trained immunity' offers hope in fight against coronavirus

A novel form of immunological memory that was mostly ignored for a century extends the benefits of vaccines. It could be of help in ending the COVID pandemic.

QUANTA

Nanohealers

Tiny particles cloaked in cell membranes sop up blood toxins and calm inflammation.

SCIENCE NEWS

Could the immune system be key to Alzheimer's disease?

Increasing evidence suggests that chronic inflammation takes a toll on the brain over the course of a lifetime.

KNOWABLE

NEUROSCIENCE

Do DIY brain-booster devices work?

Zapping the cranium may juice up neuron circuits, and use is rising—but there might be a cognitive price.

SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN

Could a zap to the brain derail destructive impulses?

A brain implant already used to treat severe epilepsy might also help fend off impulses to abuse drugs or overeat before they happen, researchers say.

NPR

Big brain, big data

Neuroscientists are starting to share and integrate data—but shifting to a team approach isn't easy.

NATURE

STEM DIVERSITY & DISPARITIES

Tackle negative thinking head-on to boost diversity in biomedicine

One California university is trying a new strategy to help minority students perform in STEM classes and develop the mental resilience to face future challenges.

NPR

Atopic dermatitis underrecognized, undertreated in patients of color

Skin disease images that are found online or in medical textbooks mostly show white patients, yet atopic dermatitis can be more common and more severe in certain other ethnic groups.

MEDSCAPE

Building diversity in science, one interaction at a time

Even fleeting moments of bias and stereotyping can make minorities feel unwelcome in science classrooms. Can documenting those moments help?

UNDARK

TECHNOLOGY & STARTUPS

A new breed of cancer immunotherapy

Glycoscience-focused start-ups look to broaden the benefits of immuno-oncology with drugs that target a protein family called Siglecs and their glycan ligands.

CHEMICAL & ENGINEERING NEWS

Thumb-sized microscope captures images deep inside the brains of active animals

After years of development, researchers have managed to shrink two-photon microscopy into a device that can be mounted on rodents' heads without impeding behaviour.

NATURE

Be Biopharma: B cells as protein factories

Plasma cells can be turned into protein factories for patients with protein deficiencies for whom one-and-done gene therapy is not an option.

NATURE BIOTECHNOLOGY

FOR KIDS

Why can't bugs be grub?

Researchers are studying why some people think eating insects is gross—.and how to change that.

SCIENCE NEWS FOR STUDENTS

Superbugs: A silent health emergency

Bacteria are outsmarting antibiotics to an alarming degree.

SCIENCE NEWS FOR STUDENTS

Ants in space

Learning how ants search is helping scientists design robots and may help them better understand the brain, the Internet and other complex systems.

MUSE

THIS AND THAT

Wanted: More data, the dirtier the better

The computational immunologist Purvesh Khatri embraces messy data as a way to capture the messiness of disease. As a result, he's making elusive genomic discoveries.

QUANTA

Medical cargo could be the gateway for routine drone deliveries

Proposals for drones to carry blood, trauma supplies and lab samples are awaiting approval by the Federal Aviation Administration.

NPR

The secret power of the cell's waste bin

Trash collectors in the cell moonlight at the controls of the genetic machinery.

QUANTA